DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorChitumbo, Kaluba-
dc.contributor.authorLiou, Joanne Lynn-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-23T16:14:17Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.date.submitted2020-06-
dc.identifier.citation<div class="csl-bib-body"> <div class="csl-entry">Liou, J. L. (2020). <i>A Roadmap to deploy small modular reactors in emerging newcomer countries to sustainably increase energy access – a case study of Tanzania</i> [Master Thesis, Technische Universität Wien]. reposiTUm. https://doi.org/10.34726/hss.2020.80653</div> </div>-
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.34726/hss.2020.80653-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12708/15060-
dc.description.abstractEfforts to achieve the target of universal access to energy services has made visible progress; however, gaps are still prevalent, mainly concentrated in remote and rural regions of developing states across Africa and Asia. As global efforts seek to implement clean and innovative solutions, the increased use of renewable energy coupled with the introduction of nuclear energy supplied by small modular reactors (SMRs) and micro modular reactors (MMRs) has the potential to fill such gaps. For this thesis, 10 to 300 MW reactors are categorized as small, and less than 10 MW reactors are categorized as micro. This thesis examines considerations for SMR and MMR deployment and analyzes the International Atomic Energy Agency's Milestones Approach, in conjunction with SMR deployment indicators and the 3S concept – safeguards, safety and security. The analysis culminates in SMR and MMR deployment roadmaps that establish the timing for deployment between 4 to 10 years, compared with 10 to 15 years for a conventional nuclear power plant. The benefits of deploying modular reactors to increase access to clean energy and to replace carbon-intensive sources of energy supply are discussed and demonstrated with a case study in Tanzania. Based on regional peak demand and Tanzania's generation and transmission plan by 2030, Tanzania has SMR deployment potential of about 4,750 MW, which would replace coal- and gas-powered plants and eliminate associated emissions. Furthermore, MMR deployment could play a significant role in helping Tanzania reach its 75 percent electrification goal by 2030. Tanzania's analysis provides a proxy for nuclear newcomers and interested countries that may face similar challenges concerning grid capacity and infrastructure in pursuit of introducing nuclear power into a country's energy portfolio.en
dc.formatviii, 70, 12 Blätter-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.subjectsmall modular reactoren
dc.subjectnuclear poweren
dc.subjectdeploymenten
dc.subjectgrid capacityen
dc.subjectTanzaniaen
dc.titleA Roadmap to deploy small modular reactors in emerging newcomer countries to sustainably increase energy access – a case study of Tanzaniaen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.typeHochschulschriftde
dc.identifier.doi10.34726/hss.2020.80653-
dc.publisher.placeWien-
tuw.thesisinformationTechnische Universität Wien-
tuw.publication.orgunitE017 - Continuing Education Center-
dc.type.qualificationlevelDiploma-
dc.identifier.libraryidAC15678525-
dc.description.numberOfPages70-
dc.thesistypeMasterarbeitde
dc.thesistypeMaster Thesisen
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeThesis-
item.openairetypeHochschulschrift-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.openaccessfulltextOpen Access-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextwith Fulltext-
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